fine Wine Source Wine Club
February 2017

Chateau Latour de Beraud: Château La Tour de Béraud is located in the southern part of the Rhône Valley in AOP Costières-de-Nîmes. The estate lies in the historical geographically important area between Nîmes, Arles, and Avignon. La Tour de Béraud is an ancient fire tower. Its roof was open so that everyone could easily see when a fire was set into it. It was built by in the eleventh-century on the top of the Costière (Coast). Dominating the large plain of Beaucaire, one could see 50 miles away down to Camargue…where there were other fire towers. Part of a large network of watchtowers from the Mediterranean to the Rhône River, a fire from a tower sounded the alarm when invaders were coming. The vineyards make up @30acres & are planted on terraced slopes, composed of clay and pebble soils which were deposited in the area as glaciers moved through the continent during the quaternary period, a geological time period that encompasses the most recent 2.6 million years (including the present day). This specific terroir gives freshness and balance to the wines while the sunny climate of the Rhone ripens the grapes to perfection. Francois Collard is one of the most gifted viticulteurs in the area, and along with his wife Anne, run the Chateau and manages the property that was purchased by the family in the 1960’s. Fran
About: Since the vineyards are situated only a few miles from the Rhone River. The result is an exceptional terroir composed of flat, rounded stones (“galets”) on clay and limestone, enabling the vines to draw nutrients and moisture for the depths of the soil. The galets protect the soil from evaporation and also add a touch of minerality and freshness to the wines. The vineyards were originally made up of predominantly red varietals, dominated by old vine Carignan; however, over the years Francois has expanded the varietal makeup. The vinification was done using the traditional method; maceration of 2-3 weeks in tank at 25-26 degrees, and maturation for about a year in concrete tanks to preserve its natural freshness.
Varietals: 45% Grenache Noir (Adds Fruit & Roundness), 30% Syrah (Adds Color/Finesse/Full Flavor), 15% Mourvedre (Adds Complexity&Fruit),5% Marselan (Adds Tannins/Color/Tangy Fruit)
Alcohol: 14%
Tasting Notes: Aromas of red fruit, mild spice are supported by harmoniously integrating tannin. Ready to drink now, but can be kept for 2 years…decanting is recommended.
Jim Lutfy’s Thoughts: Rustic flavors of tobacco, mushroom, and savory white pepper and sea salt notes. Best served with savory soups and roasts.

fine Wine Source Wine Club


January 2017
Chateau Galochet: Born in 1974, this cooperative has raised itself over the years to the #1 producer of Appellation d’Origine Protégée wines in France, and the leader of Cotes de Bordeaux. The French government, not too long ago, officially announced that the long standing AoC (Appellation d’origine Controlee) system for wine is being replaced by a new quality ladder with the top step being an AoP, or Appellation d’Origine Protégée. Thierry Bergeon has managed Chateau Galochet with his wife and brother since 1996. The estate is located 30km from Bordeaux. Enthusiastic about being winegrowers and delighted to live in the country, this inseparable trio has also started breeding dairy cows and selling raw milk in the bottle, which is quite rare.
About: The vineyards are located north of Bordeaux, across the appelations of Bordeaux, Blaye Cotes de Bordeaux, and Cotes de Bourg. The terroir is clay and limestone and the plantings are of the Bordeaux varietals, but majority Merlot. The wine is fermented in 100% stainless steel vats. Its strength resides in combining traditional know how with modern techniques. To get the most out of this Bordeaux, decanting for a minimum of one hour is recommended.
Varietal: 100% Merlot
Alcohol: 14%
Tasting Notes: This wine has an attractive deep garnet-red hue and fruity nose with hits of red currant berries. It starts out firm and fruity on the palate, with soft, very round tannin (which will be more pronounced without decanting). The finish is smooth and long.
Jim Lutfy’s Thoughts: Elegant and silky with flavors of cherries and strawberries. A great Merlot from Bordeaux!! Great served with a Pot Roast or lamb of any kind. Cheers!


Our Pricing :
Regular Price -> $119.99
Case Price (12 Bottles Per Case)->$99.99
Country: France
Region : Cognac
Alcohol: 17%
About Wine:
It’s sweet, strong ‘Vin de Liqueur’ of the Charentais (Cognac) region of western France. It is made by adding 25 Years Old Cognac eau-de-vie to Grand Cru Chardonnay.
You can catch a lot of Flavors of this Wine,we are talking here about touch of Hazelnut,Caramel,Nougat and layers of complexity.words cannot do justice to describe this wine.

April Imported Wine: 2014 Domaine Haut Bridau PicPoul Blanc, PicPoul de Pinet, FRANCE

Located in the heart of the massif of Castelnaux, in the terroirs of Picpoul de Pinet appellation, this family estate spreads over 11 hectares.

The Story: Domaine Haut Bridau is located in Castelnaux, Fance, in the terroirs of the PicPoul de Pinet appellation. The Domaine is run by the Pages family since the beginning of the last century. Today, grandson Christian is in charge of the property.

Vineyard: Known since the 14th century, the grape variety Piquepoul has always been synonymous with quality. The production is limited to 1200 hectares in the appellation and makes the PicPoul de Pinet a rare region.

Varietal(s): 100% Piquepoul Blanc

Alcohol: 12.0% by volume

Food Pairings: The round and well balanced fruit will ideally accompany shellfish and grilled fish. Try with paella as well! Serve well chilled.

Tasting Notes: Lovely pale yellow color, bright and clear. Fruity and floral nose with hawthorne and lime tree fragrances. Lively and fresh mouth with harmonious acidity and roundness.

Jim Lutfy’s thoughts: “Wow! What a wine! Loaded with flavors of lemon and minerality, with zippy, clean acidity and liveliness! Pairs great with oysters, chicken or seafood. Cheers!”-JL

March Imported Wine: 2013 Château Gigognan 'Vigne du Prieure' Cotes du Rhone, Rhone, FRANCE

At the heart of the Valley of the Rhone, 10 minutes from Châteauneuf du Pape, Château Gigognan is the heir of a deeply rooted history that dates back to the time of roman colonization.

A spiritual and temporal lordship: The estate quickly becomes a fiefdom which formed a principality with Châteauneuf du Pape and Bédarrides, one governed by the archbishops of Avignon.

During the 17th and 18th century, the administration of Gigognan was entrusted to Lords from Provence by the archbishops of Avignon. Its prosperity gave it the title of a village with the rank of a municipality.

Since 1996, the castle knows a true rebirth thanks to Jacques Callet. Having been completely renovated, it was given back the charm of the great manors of Provence.

In 2012, a new team of expert professionals is brought together. The vineyard knows an unprecedented renewal and is the object of investments to reinforce the excellence of the estate’s wines.

Varietals: 60% Grenache, 15% Mourvedre, 15% Syrah and 10% Carignan

Alcohol: 12.5% by volume

The Terroir: Southern exposure on an ancient terrace of sand and limestone.

Vinification: Temperature controlled fermentation by cepage; maceration for 8-10 days depending on the grape; malolactic fermentation also occurs.

Tasting Notes: Smoke and spice on the nose with hints of red cherry fruit. On the palate, concentrated, jammy red fruits. There is a great balance with a touch of tobacco and plenty of white pepper spice on the finish.

Food Pairings: Pair with grilled lamb, beef or portabella, tuna, Mediterranean pizza and grilled sausages. Enjoy!

December Imported Wine: 2010 Chateau Bellevue Gazin Cotes de Bordeaux Red, Bordeaux, FRANCE

Owner/Commune: Alain and Anne-Sophoe Lancereau / Plassac

Background: The estate is situated at the top of the hill overlooking Plassac, a very privileged area of the Cotes de Blaye wine region on the borderline between the Pays d’Oc and the Pays d’Oeil offering a superb view over the Gironde Estuary. Alain and Anne-Sophie Lancereau bought this wine estate with the aim of making it part of a larger cultural and tourist project. Their passion for wine, and for this chateau in particular, stems from the profession of Anne-Sophie’s grandfather, a wine merchant. By investing in the vineyard in 2003, they aimed to recreate a once great wine. They have carried out extensive restructuring in the vineyard and modernized and extended the winery.

Surface or Vineyard Size: 15 ha

Average Age of Vines: 40 years

Grape Varieties: The vineyard boasts a rich mix of grape varieties: Merlot dominates, together with a large proportion of Malbec (also known as Cot), which is quite atypical. Cabernet and Petit Verdot complete the blend.

Terroir: Calcareous clay and clayey gravel

Winemaking/Ageing: A wine that certainly merits the title of “Grand Vin”. Best cellared for two years; will be ready for drinking from 2012 and onward.

Varietal(s): 70% Merlot, 15% Malbec, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Petit Verdot

Alcohol: 14.0% by volume

Food Pairings: Pair this great bottle with anything! Try with a great piece of meat, BBQ and great cheeses!

Tasting Notes: Outstandingly situated at the highest point of the Blaye region facing the Medoc with a view of the whole Gironde Estuary, this small growth has yielded a beautiful, deep red wine with deep purple tints. The product of the excellent 2010 vintage, its generous bouquet is redolent of red fruit, blackberry and blackcurrant with toasty notes denoting ageing in high-quality oak. Rich, chewy palate with an evident but not excessive tannic presence and a persistent, balanced finish.

Jim Lutfy’s thoughts: “Rich, supple and elegant. Loaded with spicy and red aromatics. Great with lamb, veal or steak! Awesome this time this year!”-JL

July Imported Wine: 2010 Chateau Moulin de Grenet AOP Lussac St. Emilion, Bordeaux, FRANCE

Nicole Roskam-Brunot and her sons, 4th generation, perpetuate a family passion for elaborating great wines of St. Emilion. Their philosophy is to obtain the highest quality, authenticity, terroir and vintage expression on each vintage.

Surrounding a picturesque windmill (1711), former land of the Faize Abbey, the Moulin de Grenet vineyard is located on one of the highest hills of its appellation. Well rooted on its slopes and limestone plateau, the vines enjoy an abundance of sun and draw their quality from the terroir to give the wines their generous, fruity and mineral personality. The vineyard practices sustainable agriculture.

Designated Growing Area: AOP Lussac St. Emilion

Soil: Clay & Limestone

The Estate: The 4.5 hectares of vines have an average yield of 40-45 hl/ ha. The grapes undergo traditional vinifcation and are aged in barrel for 16 – 18 months. Approximately 30,000 bottles of this wine are produced.

Varietals: 75% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon & Cabernet Franc

Alcohol: 12.5% by volume

Food Pairings: The soft tannins and plummy fruit character of Merlot-driven Pomerol and Saint Emilion pair well with roast duck, cornish hens, roast chicken, pork tenderloin, pork chops and soft cheeses such as Morbier, Camembert and Gouda.

Notes: This wine derives its personality from its clay and limestone terroir and an abundance of sun. It has a pretty ruby color. The nose reveals nice aromas of fruits and spices. The mouth is round and juicy. The finale is expressive. A traditional and generous Lussac St. Emilion.

Jim Lutfy’s thoughts: “St. Emilion from a great vintage. This wine is rich and layered with classic elegance. Is it silk or satin; or maybe both? Savory with a long finish. Great served with lamb of the BBQ.”-JL

March Imported Wine: 2010 Domaine de Coste Chaude Côtes du Rhône Villages L'Argentiere, Rhone, FRANCE

Out of the domaine’s 35 hectares (86 acres) lying at 350m altitude (over 1000 feet), just over 21 hectares are planted with vines whose average age is at least 40 years. Grenache is the main variety followed by Syrah with 6 hectares; and you’ll also find one plot of old Carignan.

In particular, it’s the rich and varied terroir that makes Coste Chaude special. This unique location stems from the region’s tormented geological history. In fact, 6 million years ago when the Mediterranean was completely dried up, powerful rivers tore off rocks from the Alps that now make up the conglomerated mass of the Visan plateau.

The Philosophy of Domaine de Coste Chaude: “Our farming methods reflect our aspirations to make quality wines. So getting healthy grapes is fundamental to the domaine’s philosophy.

Consequently, we use sustainable growing practices at Coste Chaude: applying fertilizers as and when the soil needs it, disease-control measures using environmentally friendly sprays or even natural grass cover to prevent erosion. This way of working is also a transitional phase towards grape growing taking a more biodynamic approach.

We deliberately do short-pruning – ‘cordon royat’ (double-cordon spur) – to keep production at between 30 and 40 hl/ha depending on each plot and the wine we want to make.

The vines are trained on several wires to allow them to grow a large leaf canopy and ensure perfect photosynthesis. We check all the different plots before picking to monitor grape ripening, which are systematically sorted on a table before going into the cellar.”-domaine-coste-chaude.com

Varietals: 80% Syrah and 20% Grenache

Alcohol: 14.5% by volume

Tasting Notes: Dominated by Syrah, this wine is full-bodied and soft, with an appealing nose of raspberries and blackcurrant. Slightly perfumed with sweet cinnamon and ginger bread. Velvety on the palate with fresh and well-integrated tannins, and a surprising array of pepper and cedar wood flavors on the finish.

Food Pairings: This wine asks for fine cooking. Think of sweetbreads and morel mushrooms, venison, and lamb!

Jim Lutfy’s thoughts: “Rich and concentrated, and loaded with layers of complexity. Flavors of white garlic, cedar, and pork. 2010 is a tremendous vintage, and I’m so excited we were able to put a great Rhone like this in the club for you. Drink this with pot roast, and sit by the fire. Enjoy!”-JL

November Imported Wine: 2010 Domaine Mireille et Vincent Côtes du Rhône Rouge, Rhone, FRANCE

Located in the municipality of Richerenches, Domaine Mireille et Vincent covers 15 hectares on the left bank of the Rhone . Very famous for its truffles, the town is also known for its wines! The Domaine was founded in 1980s by Bernard Bizard, who before that worked at several other estates. Bizard named the domaine after the couple’s two children, Mireille and Vincent, with the first vintage in 1985.

History of Domaine MIreille et Vincent and  its Relation to the Environment: The average age of vines at the Domaine is 35 years old, making the vineyards almost entirely old vines. These vines will flourish for up to 60 years, and account for over 45% of the vines planted in this area. The old vines of Domaine Mireille et Vincent are planted on hillsides with red clay and are more or less pebbly. These strong vineyards give the wine a powerful aroma. Other vineyards in the Domaine are located on old truffle fields, and enjoy a refreshing Mediterranean climate, including wind from the Alps. All of these environmental factors give character and distinction to the wines of this area, and especially the wines at Domaine Mireille et Vincent.

“We are not organic, but we believe in the environment,” said Bernard Bizard . Bizard implements new practices constantly to allow the grapes to truly shine. The Domaine produces three separate Côtes du Rhône: one white, one red, and a rosé. The white wine is crafted from traditional varieties (Roussanne , Clairette , Marsanne and Viognier) and have a light color with pale gold shades . The red is typically a blend of Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault and Carignan and is characterized by spicy notes. Lastly, the rosé is a prettier style but has some spice as well.

Varietals: Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault, Carignan

Alcohol: 14.0% by volume

Tasting Notes: Cool and elegant, pure, and with a lovely scent of berries.

Food Pairings: Pair this wine with a hearty meat dish, ragu, or even a roast. This wine will be great with your Thanksgiving turkey as well.

Jim Lutfy’s thoughts: “Extremely flavorful, with notes of Worchester, garlic salt, and onion. A very pretty and delicate style, with beautiful aromatics. The vintage gives the wine ripeness, but it is not over the top. Enjoy with soups and stews.”-JL

2011 Domaine Leflaive Offering

2011 Domaine Leflaive Offering

Founded in 1717, Domaine Leflaive has long been one of the most highly regarded white wine producers in Burgundy. During its respectable history, the domaine has acquired parcels in four of the five Montrachet grand crus and four of the best premier crus. Under the stewardship of Anne-Claude Leflaive, the domaine converted entirely to biodynamic farming practices in the 1990s.Distinguishing Domaine Leflaive beyond the impeccable pedigree of its vineyard sites and biodynamic practices, are the skill and care of its winemaking. The combination of these efforts has produced remarkable results, further elevating the standard for one of the world’s greatest wines.

Pure Burgundian Offerings

The Leflaive family can trace its roots in Burgundy back more than 400 years, when Marc Le Flayve lived in Cissey, not far from Beaune. Nearly two centuries later, his descendent, Claude Leflaive took up residence in Puligny and married a girl from the village in 1717. After establishing the family’s domaine, Claude became one of the first vignerons on record in Puligny.

The 20th-Century Vigneron

Over the next 200 years, the family’s land was divided between each new generation due to French inheritance laws. Among those to receive a parcel was Joseph Leflaive, who inherited the family domaine and a mere 2 hectares (5 acres) of vines in 1905. He was a brilliant student and, at the age of 20 became a maritime engineer, later taking part in the construction of the first French submarine. Despite his maritime career, Joseph retained strong ties to his family domaine and over the years gradually built up its vineyard holdings.

In the aftermath of the phylloxera and oïdium epidemics of the late 19th century, numerous vineyard owners began selling their land. This was a golden opportunity for Joseph, who acquired parcels in exceptional climats: Le Chevalier, Le Bâtard, Les Bienvenues, Les Pucelles and Le Clavoillon. By 1926, he had increased the domaine’s holdings to 20 hectares (50 acres). He then returned to Puligny to oversee the estate. Working with his respected friend and steward, François Virot, Joseph systematically replanted his land with Chardonnay.

The Next Generation

Described by Clive Coates in his 1997 book, “Côte d’Or,” Vincent was a “doyen of Puligny and a man of great charm, wit, hospitality and winemaking genius.” He earned this praise when he and his brother Joseph (Jo) took over the family domaine after their father’s death in 1953. It was Vincent who acquired a tiny parcel of Le Montrachet in 1991, which was only large enough to fill a single 500-liter (132-gallon) cask. The domaine now has parcels in four of the five Montrachet grand crus and four of the best premier crus, including a large portion of Clavoillon, for a total of 23 hectares (57 acres).

Innovator and Meticulous Conservator

In 1990, Vincent’s daughter, Anne-Claude Leflaive, and Jo’s son, Olivier, became co-directors of the domaine. Olivier has since concentrated on his négociant business, and, after her father’s death in 1993, Anne-Claude has assumed the sole responsibilities of the domaine. The ascendancy of a new generation at Domaine Leflaive brought a spirit of re-evaluation and experimentation, particularly in regard to vineyard management.

Anne-Claude immediately took a passionate interest in the long-term health of the vineyards, and to that end began biodynamic treatment of 1 hectare (2.5 acres) of vineyards in 1990. By 1997, Domaine Leflaive was farmed entirely according to biodynamic principles.

Anne-Claude’s passion and her dedication are evident in every aspect of the domaine, from her respect for the soil to her commitment to quality throughout the winemaking process. She has thoroughly maintained her family’s pioneering spirit while demonstrating great prescience in her full adoption of biodynamic viticulture. Her progressive nature has firmly cemented Domaine Leflaive as a benchmark for all Burgundy producers.

The 2011 Vintage: Puligny-Montrachet

The 2010-2011 winter was marked by snow at the end of November and during December 2010, followed by dry and not particularly cold weather in January and February. In March, after some rainfall at the beginning of the month, temperatures rose and budburst was noted at month’s end.

The April sun sent temperatures up, while the vines developed quickly in the dry atmosphere. A lovely month of May enabled flowering under the most favorable auspices, although somewhat prematurely (May 13-16). June was magnificent, preserving the vintage’s sunny, precocious nature.

July was marked by storms, as well as temperatures that were chilly for the season. From the beginning of August, however, the sun was back, along with several very hot days, resulting in rapid ripening.

The harvest ran from August 25-31, the earliest ever seen at Domaine Leflaive.

Once the wines hummed their way through alcoholic fermentation, malolactic fermentation kept them fizzing throughout the winter. The wines have an acid/mineral structure and framework showing finesse and elegance. They are the very definition of the qualities inherent in each of our magnificent parcels.

The 2011 vintage can be appreciated at the earliest as follows:
Bourgogne Blanc beginning in 2013
Puligny-Montrachet beginning in 2014
Premiers Crus beginning in 2015
Grand Crus beginning in 2017
Montrachet beginning in 2019

The 2011 Vintage: Mâcon-Verzé

At the end November and during December 2010, there was some snow in the Mâcon. Following this, the winter of 2011 (January and February) was a fairly mild and dry one. March was mild, with an early start to vegetation at the end of the month.

Budburst was very steady in April thanks to summery temperatures. May was a lovely month. The vines continued their growth, and the first flowers appeared around May 19. June was lovelier still, as was the first week in July. Beginning on July 7, however, cool and damp weather set in.

In August warm, sunny conditions returned and finished ripening the grape clusters. An early harvest began on Friday, September 2.

To summarize, “early” is the defining word for the 2011 vintage. The wines have a good acid structure balanced by delicious, sugary fruit, the whole underpinned by excellent minerality.

2011 Domaine Leflaive Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru

$549.99 per bottle  $499.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Bourgogne Blanc 

$69.99 per bottle  $59.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Mâcon-Verzé

$49.99 per bottle  $44.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Meursault 1er Cru sous le Dos d’Âne

$179.99 per bottle  $159.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet  

$129.99 per bottle  $109.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Clavoillon  

$169.99 per bottle  $149.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Combettes

$259.99 per bottle  $229.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)

2011 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatieres

$239.99 per bottle  $229.99 per bottle by the case (6 bottles or more)