Fine Wine Source Wine

March 2018

Chateau Tarin:

Chateau Tarin is tucked away in The village of Cazaugitat is located in the Southwest of France in the Entre Deux Mers region, 48 km from the city center of Bordeaux. Known as the Garden of Eden, it is a sleepy town with only 255 inhabitants. Entre-Deux-Mers is a wine region in Bordeaux, in France. It is situated between the rivers Garonne and Dordogne, and is bounded in the east by the border of the Gironde department and in the west by the Bec d’Ambès, the confluence of the Garonne and the Dordogne. At 3,000 hectares (7,400 acres), it is the largest sub-region of Bordeaux, although, as there are large areas of forest, relatively little of it is used for growing grapes. The total area under vine is about 1,500 hectares (3,700 acres), with about 250 growers making wine there. The name of the region is derived, not from the French word “mer” (“sea”), but from “marée” (“tide”). Thus, it means “between two tides”, a reference to its location between two tidal rivers. The village of Cazaugitat is a small village located south west of France. The town of Cazaugitat is located in the department of Gironde of the french region Aquitaine. The town of Cazaugitat is located in the township of Pellegrue part of the district of Langon. To put the size (or lack thereof) of the population in perspective, there are only about 17 inhabitants per Kilometer, and there are 100 main residences, 14 second or occasional homes and 12 vacant homes.

About:

Chateau Tarin has approximately 98 acres of gravelly soil planted to Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Cabernet Sauvignon. The 2015 Chateau Tarin Vin de Bordeaux is fermented as per the traditional method, in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks. It is cold soaked and then fermented between twelve and twenty-one days.

Cepage:

70% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc, 5% Cabernet Sauvignon

Alcohol:

13%

Tasting Notes:

Bright cherry and deep currant greet the nose and lead to a dark and brooding flavor profile of black cherry fruit on the palate enhanced by balanced acidity on the finish. This is a young wine that will reward patience in cellaring, but can be enjoyed on the table after at least an hour or two decant and/or aeration. You may even want to go as far as opening the Tarin, sampling a glass, replacing the cork and allowing it to open in the bottle overnight.

Food Pairings:

Steak frites (steak and duck fat fries) might just be the perfect complement to red Bordeaux. The boldness of Bordeaux compliments the umami in the meat and the wine’s “grippy” tannins are smoothed out by the dish’s fat content. In fact, Bordeaux wine will taste sweet and fruity against this rich meaty backdrop. The steak frites example shows us that when pairing foods with Bordeaux, you’ll want to seek out foods with a.)plenty of umami and b.) fat to counteract tannin. Beyond this, you can get creative with your pairings. Here are some examples: (Meats) Black Pepper Steak, Roast Pork, Filet Mignon, Beef Brisket, Buffalo Burgers, Chicken Liver, Pot Roast, Venison, Duck, Goose, Dark Meat Turkey, (Cheeses) Ossau Iraty, Basque Cheeses, Manchego, Swiss Cheese, Comté, White Cheddar, Provolone, Pepper Jack, (Spices)Black Pepper, White Pepper, Oregano, Rosemary, Mustard Seed, Cumin, Coriander Seed, Anise, (Vegetables) Roast Potatoes, Lentils, Mushrooms, Onion, Green Onion, Green Bean Casserole, Chestnut.

Jim Lutfy’s Thought’s

Soft & supple with flavors of cedar & tobacco and a long earthy finish. A wine that needs at least an hour of decanting, best served with grilled meats.

Fine Wine Source Wine

March 2018

Skyfall Vineyards:

Skyfall Vineyard was named for massive car-sized boulders scattered among the vines, appearing to have fallen from the sky. These glacial rocks were left in the wake of the ancient Missoula floods that cut the Columbia River. Floods deposited silty loam soil mixed with volcanic ash for soil conditions that create complex, elegant wines. Dave Minick, 3rd generation Washington State grower, oversees all vineyard management for consistent, perfectly ripe grapes across Skyfall vineyard sites. All vineyards receive the same environmentally responsible care with minimalist intervention including a new compost program for naturally enriching soils and use of low impact vehicles in vineyards. Skyfall Vineyard fruit is sourced from Washington’s top AVAs within Columbia Valley including Horse Heaven Hills, Wahluke Slope, and Yakima Valley. Columbia Valley has optimal growing conditions with hot days allowing grapes to ripen and cool nights where acidity develops. This means Skyfall Vineyard wines are well balanced between the crisp acidity, firm tannins, and ripe fruit structure, ready for immediate enjoyment.

About:

From David Minick: “My grandfather would always tell me that ‘great wine starts with finding the ideal vineyard site;’ however, this is a lot easier said than done! I walked a lot of vineyard sites before finding Skyfall’s sites, and the complexity of the soils is ideal for cultivating optimal flavors in the grapes.” The varietals for the 2015 Skyfall Merlot were sourced from 60% Yakima Valley vineyard sites and 40% Horse Heaven Hills vineyard sites. The grapes were picked at the peak of ripeness during the early morning to preserve maximum fruit expression. Once picked the fruit was de-stemmed, crushed and cold soaked for 24-48 hours until optimal color extraction was reached. The wines were put in oak barrels for malolactic fermentation and then aged for 8 months (47% American Oak and 53% French Oak.) The blend was then assembled and allowed to co-mingle for 30 days prior to bottling.

Varietals:

82% Merlot, 10% Syrah, 8% Cabernet Sauvignon

Alcohol:

13.93%

Tasting Notes:

Wonderfully developed plum, vanilla, and leather aromas swirl in the glass. Juicy flavors of cherry candy coupled with hints of cocoa powder weave through the palate. Balanced acidity and polished tannins round out the finish.

Food Pairings:

Merlot wine matches with a wide variety of foods because of its position in the middle of the red wine spectrum. In general Merlot pairs well with chicken and other light meats as well as lightly-spiced dark meats. With medium tannin and not too much acidity you’ll find Merlot pairs well with many foods. Be wary of pairing merlot with fish or leafy vegetables (unless they are prepared in certain ways) and spicy foods, which can overwhelm the nuanced flavors.

Jim Lutfy’s Thoughts:

Big & rich layers of complexity with a long silky smooth finish!! Best served with Lamb or Spare Ribs.